Air NZ email update – simple, but love it


I’m a big fan of the Air NZ email templates. They constantly amaze me how they can turn a simple email template into something that looks great. Their themes and header graphics really help to do that.

I just received an email last week and found that they have updated the top of their email to include the logo, subscription preference and social links (see screen grabs below). I really like that they have included their logo in this top section, even though there is a double logo top left. Perfect to handle any image blockers and frustrating image restricting email clients.

Air NZ email example header - 2 August 2010

Air NZ email example header - 2 August 2010

Air NZ email example header - 2 August 2010 (details)

Air NZ email example header - 2 August 2010 (details)

OPPORTUNITY

There really is only one thing missing from this revised email header. It is a link to ‘viewing on mobile device’, which if the stats were looked at I’m sure it’s on the rise.

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Who has the best designed emails? Air NZ


I hate to say it but airline newsletters are boring. All they focus on are pushing deals and deals with little or no personality included. This is true for all airlines except Air New Zealand.

It doesn’t matter if it is a domestic or international email/offer, every piece of communication has been designed really well. There are elements of every email that are the same, but each have their own idea and design, all represented in the email header (see screens below).

Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

Air NZ Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

Air NZ Get Packing email

Air NZ Get Packing email (holiday deals)

Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

Air NZ Best of the West email

Air NZ Best of the West email

Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

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OBSERVATIONS:

  • Email header: all emails provide the ability to view the email online or to manage your email preferences.
  • Preview pane: the most important part of the email is what is visable in the preview panel. This is what will encourage consumers to click through. The preview panel of each of the above emails is very engaging and encourages opens.
  • Logo: the Air NZ logo appears on the top left-hand side of every email. The only exception is for the holiday deals email (see above Get Packing example).
  • Headline driven: each of the email is headline driven. All of the headlines relates to the offer or element that is being promoted in the email.

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Stay tuned for more Air NZ email review posts. They are coming through soon.

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How many emails is too many? Qantas Frequent Flyer, Air NZ & Apple


After being consumed by work for the last few weeks, I’m spending the weekend cleaning out my Gmail account. I’d forgotten how many marketing related emails I receive on a weekly basis. There are a few corporate emails/newsletters I keep so I can learn more about their communication strategies. There are three that I find really interesting: Qantas Frequent Flyer, Air New Zealand and Apple. Each of them a little different:

  • Qantas Frequent Flyer – I’m on the mailing list because it is a program I’ve been a member of for 8 years and a service that I use about once a month. They have a lot of information on me and my flying habits.
  • Air New Zealand – I’m on the mailing list because I entered a competition about 12 months ago.
  • Apple – I’m on the mailing list because I have a number of their products.

Below is an overview of their email send patterns.

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QANTAS

Qantas Frequent Flyer send on average an email a week, which for a service I only use once a month seems a little excessive. Rather than sending me so many emails, it would be great if Qantas know that I am loyal to their service and only send me emails that are relevant. I’m a Frequent Flyer, a Qantas loyalist and majority of my flights (domestic and international) are with Qantas, they have a lot of information about me, so they can make some simple assumptions and predictions about my travel behaviour. I’m more than willing to give them more information so they can tailor offers or remind me of seasonal travel that are specifically about my travel.

Qantas Frequent Flyer emails - Jan - April 2009

Qantas Frequent Flyer emails - Jan - April 2009

Qantas Frequent Flyer Points emails - Jan - April 2009

Qantas Frequent Flyer Points emails - Jan - April 2009

OBSERVATIONS:

  • Between 1 January – 4 April 2009, Qantas have sent me 16 emails.
  • There are three types of emails: points balance, offers and press releases. Points balance sent out monthly, offers sent out a weekly and press releases sent out occasionally.
  • The lag time between emails is around a week. Only once have there been two emails sent on the same day.
  • Points balances are usually send out mid month, ranging between 16 – 21
  • The subject lines are inconsistent for offer based emails and quite lengthy. Points balance seems to have a formular, as to press releases.
  • Majority of emails are sent in the late afternoon or evening and it’s only been the last 3 sends that have been delivered in the morning.

LEARNINGS:

  • Be relevant: Qantas knows me and my habits, so give me information you think I want. Find out more about me and what I want from Qantas.

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AIR NEW ZEALAND

The competition I entered, and gave my details to Air New Zealand, was for a domestic competition for flights within New Zealand. Majority of the emails sent to me are for domestic travel. It seems that Air New Zealand don’t have any strategy to the email sends and they are all offer based. In January 2009, they sent 3 emails about a week a part. In February 2009, there were only 2 emails sent, spaced evenly throughout the month and in March 2009, there was only one.

Air New Zealand emails - Jan - April 2009

Air New Zealand emails - Jan - April 2009

OBSERVATIONS:

  • Between 1 January – 4 April 2009, Air New Zealand have sent me 6 emails (10 less than Qantas).
  • There are two types of offer emails: domestic offers and international offers. Each email is very focused and only tries to communicate one message.
  • The subject lines are inconsistent, but quite short. Most subject lines include a time based message: 48hrs or 72hrs.
  • Majority of emails are sent outside work hours. I’m not sure if this is because I am Sydney based rather than in NZ.

LEARNINGS:

  • Push me: I’m not a member of Air New Zealand’s frequent flyer program, so why aren’t Air New Zealand giving me free membership, offering me an incentive to join or ask me why I’m not a member.

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APPLE:

I have countless iPods, an iPhone, a laptop, Mac mini and an iMac, however, Apple rarely remeber this in their communications to me. They do a great job in keeping the emails single minded or product focused.

Apple emails - Jan - April 2009

Apple emails - Jan - April 2009

OBSERVATIONS:

  • Between 1 January – 4 April 2009, Apple have sent me 8 emails.
  • There are two types of emails: new product launches and event reminders (Valentine’s Day, starting uni). There is no structure to the email sends, they are sent when ready or relevant.
  • In January 2009, there were 3 emails sent all after mid way through the month. In February 2009, there was only one email sent in the latter part of the month. In March 2009, there were 4 emails sent, fairly evenly split over the month.
  • The subject lines are inconsistent and occasionally lengthy. The new product emails seems to have a formular, either ‘introducing …’ or ‘The new …’.
  • Majority of emails during work time, usually in the early afternoon between 1 – 3pm.

LEARNINGS:

  • Remember me: I’m a customer, a very loyal one with multiple products, so why aren’t you being relevant to me and sending me upgrade messages. Stop pretending not to know who I am.

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OVERALL THOUGHT STARTERS:

Email is such a powerful communications channel and there are so few companies using it for more than just a collection of stories the companies want to push out to consumers. There is little focus on the customer and what they want from the communications. If it is relevant, consumers are more inclined to read and get involved (buy, upgrade, provide info). There is so much potential for companies to show that they truely know their consumers through email, so why isn’t anyone doing it.

What are some thought starters for emails?

  • Know your subscribers: understand why people have signed up to your newsletter. Put some thought into what might be of interest to them and help move them down the purchase funnel based on relevant content.
  • Ask your subscribers questions: subscribers are more than happy to give companies more information if it is going to be used to give them information they want. Before asking questions, think about where the information will be stored (is it in the legacy database or a specific email database), how often you want to refine the database (half yearly, yearly) and what is the optimum number of versions for the newsletter you can afford to create.

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