Local cafe using Twitter for orders


Lena was having a coffee at her local in Maroubra last week and found out that they are taking orders via Twitter from all the businesses around the area. This is definitely one of the best uses of Twitter I’ve seen by a small business.

Apparently this cafe has been around for ages, but they are being very smart in the way they are pushing forward for their existing customers. You can see below the flyer created by the cafe (very simple) to alert people of the offering.

Cafe using Twitter - November 2010

Cafe using Twitter - November 2010

I love this and love how rustic and honest the execution is.

Congrats Billy’s Cafe. Keep up the good work.

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LEARNINGS:

  • AWARENESS: You don’t need to create anything too fancy to let existing customers know you are doing something new. A thick cardboard flyer located at the counter is enough.
  • SPEND: You don’t need to spend a great deal to get something new up and running – just an appetite for something new and a desire to innovate.
  • MONITORING: You do need to monitor this service, so hopefully the cafe has a smart device or a computer close by to ensure all orders are fulfilled.

    How companies are recognising customer’s birthday? Sephora email


    Ok, so it’s been a while, but I’m back and inspired about email marketing and a few other digital marketing things.

    February is one of the best months because it’s my birthday and I can see which companies I subscribe (newsletters) remember my birthday and what they offer me. My birthday is under two weeks away and I’ve only received one email targeting my birthday. The thoughtful email was from Sephora, a US cosmetic and beauty company doing some great stuff online.

    Below is the email I received:

    Sephora - My birthday email sent on 6 Feb 2010

    Sephora - My birthday email sent on 6 Feb 2010

    This email details are:

    • Send date: Saturday, 6th February 2010 – exactly two weeks before my birthday
    • Send time: 8.59pm (Sydney time)
    • Subject line: It’s almost your birthday! Open your gift early.
    • Offer: Beautiful Eyes Kit redeemable instore or online
    • Small print: The offer is valid for one month (two weeks before and two weeks after my birthday)

    When I clicked through to the site from the email, this is the journey I went on.

    1. Signed in page (personalised Sephora page)

    Sephora Login - Birthday message

    Sephora Login - Birthday message

    2. Birthday offer highlighted as the first message

    Sephora Login - Birthday message details

    Sephora Login - Birthday message details

    3. Automatic offer included in checkout

    Sephora Login - Checkout with birthday message

    Sephora Login - Checkout with birthday message

    KEY LEARNINGS:

    • Subject lines: Subject line invites you to open the email because there is a mention of a gift. I opened this email instantly to see what my present was.
    • Customer journey: Ensure the customer journey is seamless. If you make it easy for a consumer, they have a great experience and will return.

    ————————————————————————-

    RELATED POSTS

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    How to make an email look great but work from a template – Air NZ


    One of my previous post (Who has the best designed emails? Air NZ) focused on why Air New Zealand have the best designed emails, this one looks at the different elements that are reused or templated between the emails (ie the consistencies).

    How often are Air NZ sending emails?

    This is a really important question when you are using templates. If emails are sent daily (eick), then the email template needs to be very similar with just minor changes being made prior to sends. Unlike the other airlines (particularly Qantas and JetStar), Air NZ doesn’t spam their base (well not me anyway). Below is an overview of the amount of emails they have sent since December 2008 (total of 14 over 6 months – just over two per month). This means that at least Air NZ don’t need to compromise the design for frequency.

    Air NZ emails sent

    Air NZ emails sent - 15 December 2008 - 7 June 2009

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    WHAT ELEMENTS ARE THE SAME?

    Air NZ’s emails are divided into four sections:

    1. Header – each individually designed dependent on the offer/email theme (UNIQUE)
    2. Body – follows a similar format across all emails, but designed dependent on the email theme (PART TEMPLATED)
    3. CTA – exactly the same across all emails (TEMPLATED)
    4. Base (email preferences) – exactly the same across all emails (TEMPLATED)

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    Body – below are two examples of the email body and the similarities between them. The two examples show an international email (Aussie Airfares) vs a domestic email (Domestic Airfares). This section is divided into two key parts:

    • offer information
    • functional area where the subscriber can start their airfare search within the email.
    Air NZ offers template (email body)

    Air NZ offers template (email body) - International

    Air NZ offers template (email body) - version 2

    Air NZ offers template (email body) - Domestic

    —————————————-

    CTA – each of Air NZ’s emails have a really strong call to action and it is consistent across all emails. There are four options for the subscriber (see below) giveing them the option to be directed to the different business areas within Air NZ (holidays and airfares), as well as communication channels (web or phone).

    Air NZ calls to action (CTA)

    Air NZ calls to action (CTA)

    —————————————-

    Base (email preferences) – at the bottom of each of the Air NZ emails, your email preferences are displayed. I really like this feature because you can see which email address you have subscibed with (very beneficial if you have multiple addresses) and also can update the email format easily.

    Air NZ email options (bottom of email)

    Air NZ email options (bottom of email)

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    LEARNINGS

    1. Templates don’t need to mean matching luggage – you can make elements of an email the same without it looking boring.
    2. The design of the header (preview panel) is key – this is the most important part of the email and must be different and appealing to get the cut through. This shouldn’t be templated too much. Some elements should be the same (email not visible, safe list, mobile device, navigation), but there is leverage to be creative and push the design.
    3. Consistent CTA is madatory – rather than try and teach your subscriber how to use the email every time, keep some things consistent. Particularly the CTA element.
    4. Highlight email preferences – don’t hide the subscribers preferences, highlight them and show them what else they can be doing. It adds value.

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    RELATED POSTS

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    Who has the best designed emails? Air NZ


    I hate to say it but airline newsletters are boring. All they focus on are pushing deals and deals with little or no personality included. This is true for all airlines except Air New Zealand.

    It doesn’t matter if it is a domestic or international email/offer, every piece of communication has been designed really well. There are elements of every email that are the same, but each have their own idea and design, all represented in the email header (see screens below).

    Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

    Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

    Air NZ Domestic Deals email

    Air NZ Domestic Deals email

    Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

    Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

    Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

    Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

    Air NZ Get Packing email

    Air NZ Get Packing email (holiday deals)

    Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

    Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

    Air NZ Best of the West email

    Air NZ Best of the West email

    Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

    Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

    ——————————–

    OBSERVATIONS:

    • Email header: all emails provide the ability to view the email online or to manage your email preferences.
    • Preview pane: the most important part of the email is what is visable in the preview panel. This is what will encourage consumers to click through. The preview panel of each of the above emails is very engaging and encourages opens.
    • Logo: the Air NZ logo appears on the top left-hand side of every email. The only exception is for the holiday deals email (see above Get Packing example).
    • Headline driven: each of the email is headline driven. All of the headlines relates to the offer or element that is being promoted in the email.

    ———————————

    Stay tuned for more Air NZ email review posts. They are coming through soon.

    ———————————

    RELATED POSTS:

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    Do you need a welcome? J.Crew thinks you do


    As part of most email or newsletter programs, there is a confirmation or activation email that is sent after you subscribe online. The next email you receive after that is the first newsletter from the company.

    I subscribed to the J.Crew newsletter in mid-April and was shocked to see a Welcome email from them in my inbox the following day (see screens below).

    JCrew Welcome to The Club email

    JCrew Welcome to The Club email

    Even though there is not much in this email, I like that it welcomes me to The Club. It’s a positive experience.

    The other positive thing about J.Crew is that they don’t spam like other retailers. Since signing up to the program in mid-April, I have only received 16 emails – which is about one every few days (see emails received below). With Bluefly, I receive at least one a day pushing me to buy something.

    JCrew Emails received - 12 April - 6 June 2009

    JCrew Emails received - 12 April - 6 June 2009

    There are a few common themes with the email details sent by J.Crew:

    • Time: all emails are sent in the morning (or in the afternoon US time), usually between 3.30am – 7.00am. There was only one sent later, but majority are within that timeframe.
    • Subject lines: there is no consistency in the treatment of subject lines – some are in CAPS, others are normal text, some promote sales, others promote products. The common element is that majority are reasonably short and aren’t consistent.
    • Frequency: the first and last 10 days of the month are the most active. Within this period, there is an email sent every other day.

    Stay tuned for some more J.Crew email learnings.

    ————————————————–

    RELATED POSTS:

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    Overview of Apple’s email marketing


    OK, so I have become a little obsessed with Apple’s email marketing and understanding what they are doing and not doing.

    Below is a presentation showing Apple’s email marketing or a collection of all the images used in the previous posts, as well as a screen grab of the email visable in the preview panel. It’s an interesting journey and has definitely helped me understand more about their ongoing communications and why clients love Apple so much.

    QUESTION:

    Are there any other company emails/newsletters that you think are doing a great job? Would be really interested to read anything else?

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    RELATED POSTS:

    Toyota – Why Not? Innovations leads to evolution


    Toyota have recently launched a new site focused on environmental innovation, Why Not?. It covers everything from safety, water, land, air, community and energy.

    The interesting thing about this site is that consumers can get involved and share their thoughts about what else Toyota and the community can do to make a differenct. See the journey throughout the site below:

    Toyota - Why not?

    Toyota - Why not?

    Toyota - Why not? Main navigation

    Toyota - Why not? Main navigation

    Toyota - Why not? Water

    Toyota - Why not? Water

    Toyota - Why not? Submit

    Toyota - Why not? Submit

    LEARNINGS:

    1. Consumer involvement – as long as you register on the site, you are able to submit your thoughts.
    2. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) – so many companies are getting on the CSR bandwagon. Fingers crossed there will be more and more meaning that combined there is a bigger focus on doing something to help the environment.
    3. Simple site – this is such a simple site, you know what you need to do as soon as you get to the home page. No learning necessary.
    4. Multiple navigation options – rather than having one option to navigate through the site there are several: top left, centre, footer, circle navigation, drop down menu.
    5. Logo link – rather than linking consumers back to the Toyota home page when they click on the Toyota logo in the top left hand corner, it links to the about Toyota and lists the other CSR events they are into.

    RELATED POSTS:

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    Summary of Obama’s marketing material


    In 2008, the year belonged to Obama. Every country was touched by something Obama was doing online. He was everywhere, using a variety of online tactics – everything from smear campaigns to ongoing email campaigns that encouraged donation to rallying support on a number of social networks. His campaign was exhaustive.

    Examples of his marketing efforts are captured in this presentation.

    KEY LEARNINGS

    1. Leverage communities & networks – majority of Obama’s campaign was focused on friend get friend (FGF) and encouraging others to show their support whether through donation or rallying others.
    2. Consistent presence – the ongoing one-to-one communications didn’t let up. There was (and still is) a constant flow of emails from everyone in the Obama camp. Emails came from Michelle Obama to Joe Biden to Al Gore.
    3. Lack of Obama involvement – there weren’t many times when Obama was involved. It was obvious that a ghost writer was controlling the campaign. It would have been nice to recieve more from Obama. The only thing he was involved in was producing the videos.
    4. Candidate usage – no marketing collateral was produced that didn’t have direct reference to Joe or Obama. Candidates images were constantly used to ensure people had a connection.

    RELATED POLITICAL POSTS:

    1. Who is Ben Self? Obama’s social marketing guy
    2. How retailers are getting in on the Obama bandwagon?
    3. US Political Campaigns – Social Networks
    4. What can Australian Politicans learn from the US?
    5. Australian Policitian’s – where are you online?
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    Woolworths Get the Facts – ACCC price enquiry site


    While I was at Mark/M&C Saatchi, we created a site for Woolworths to help address any consumer questions that arose out of the ACCC enquiry. It was Woolworths Facts (see screen grabs below).

    Woolworths Get the Facts - website

    Woolworths Get the Facts - website

    It provided information about Woolworths: the amount of money they made, where their supplies came from, facts about the Woolworths business, how global changes affect food prices and a lot more.

    Woolworths Facts - Beef supply

    Woolworths Facts - Beef supply

    Woolworths Facts - Interesting stats

    Woolworths Facts - Interesting stats

    With so many businesses trying to guarantee their customers that they are being open and honest with them, if a company can’t sustain a blog this is a great alternative. It does need to be maintained and must have topical and relevant information.

    LEARNINGS

    1. Media support – the only place this campaign was promoted was via a small promotional tile on the Woolworths homepage. Because Woolworths are the only retailer within the Australian market focused on providing ‘The Facts’, they should be promoting it in additional places.
    2. Email support – building on the media support, there should have been an email sent to the Woolworths Everyday Rewards database. This could have been an element of a usual newsletter rather than a bespoke email focused on ‘The Facts’.
    3. Maintenance – to ensure a site like this remains fresh and relevant, it must be maintained and updated with current information. There needs to be a maintenance plan with regular updates scheduled.

    RELATED BLOG POSTS

    1. Get the Facts – Companies trying to be honest
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    How to sell cars in a recession? Offer Assurance – Hyundai Assurance


    One of the purchases most people put off in hard times is a new car. It’s a big purchase, one that involves a lot of consideration and can be delayed until better times.

    To try and encourage people in the USA to buy cars, Hyundai have partnered up with Walkaway to offer Hyundai Assurance. It’s a program that allows people, no matter of the age, health or employment status, to buy a Hyundai with a 12month security blanket if something happens to you. It even covers people for up to $7,500 in loss (if your car value goes backwards).

    This is a great marketing idea and I hope for the car industry that it extends to car brands other than just Hyundai. Until other brands offer the same assurance, it’s a great competitive advantage for Hyundai. This offer is probably best suited to Hyundai and other low cost car brands – better tie in with the target audience.

    The offer is promoted on Hyundai’s homepage – it has it’s own landing page on the Hyundai site and microsite on the Walkaway website (which is where you find out all of the details).

    Hyundai USA homepage

    Hyundai USA homepage

    Hyundai Assurance overview

    Hyundai Assurance overview

    Hyundai Assurance program details

    Hyundai Assurance program details

    Hyundai Assurance - Walkaway homepage

    Hyundai Assurance - Walkaway homepage

    Hyundai Assurance - How it works

    Hyundai Assurance - How it works

    Hyundai Assurance - Why you need it

    Hyundai Assurance - Why you need it

    Hyundai Assurance - Whats covered

    Hyundai Assurance - Whats covered

    Hyundai Assurance - How to get it

    Hyundai Assurance - How to get it

    LEARNINGS

    1. Great marketing idea – the assurance program shows that Hyundai (and Walkabout) understand their audience and the current climate. It is also a great way to try and stimulate consumption in a flat market.
    2. Reassurance – anything that can be offered to reassure a cautious audience to consume is beneficial. People need a guarantee before they will spend money or buy things that aren’t crucial.
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    What’s working on my blog? Stats update


    I’m a frustrated accountant and with that comes a love for numbers, whether they be campaign stats, JCRs or my own blog stats. I have had a couple of conversations with people about my blog stats, what’s working, what hasn’t, what I need to continue to do and what the average daily traffic is.

    I haven’t done any in-depth campaign analysis or planning for what I need to be doing to drive more traffic based on popular posts, search terms or referring URLs. Below are all of the stats that relate to my blog and some key learnings and actions I have taken out of reviewing these stats (scroll to the bottom for learnings).

    BLOG TRAFFIC – DAILY

    Dom Hind Blog Traffic Day - as at 1 November

    Dom Hind Blog Traffic Day - as at 1 November

    The huge spike was due to people investigating my blog after I commented on other popular blogs about topics I had written posts on. Traffic over the weekend dips, but as soon as new content is added on the Monday it usually goes up to higher levels than the previous Monday (except while I was on holiday when there was no new content).

    BLOG TRAFFIC – WEEKLY

    Dom Hind Blog Traffic Week - as at 1 November

    Dom Hind Blog Traffic Week - as at 1 November

    The peak was due to offline media coverage (Australian article and new job notification). The second peak is due to the commenting on others blogs, as detailed above.

    TRAFFIC REFERRERS

    Dom Hind Blog Referers - as at 1 November

    Dom Hind Blog Referrers - as at 1 November

    StumbleUpon has been the biggest driver of traffic to my blog. StumbleUpon is used as a downtime tool, therefore meaning the users spend more time investigating your blog (more time reading multiple posts). The other big driver of traffic is social networks (my own dedicated area). Within each social network, I have updated my URL or even my status to include my blog URL.

    SEARCH TERMS

    Dom Hind Blog search terms - as at 1 November

    Dom Hind Blog search terms - as at 1 November

    The most popular search terms that are driving traffic through are different derivatives of my name, whether it is my name by itself, connected to the blog, the blog URL or misspellings of my name. Overall, there have been 167 ‘Dominique Hind‘ related searches that have driven traffic to my blog. It is interesting that there haven’t been any searches for ‘Dominique Layton‘, my maiden name. The other search terms aren’t driving a high volume of traffic through to the site, but one thing to note is that there are so many different combinations.

    MOST POPULAR POSTS

    Dom Hind Blog top posts - as at 1 November

    Dom Hind Blog top posts - as at 1 November

    The posts that have received the most traffic are around my credentials: Who am I? Where have I been? Industry involvement. This makes sense due to me changing jobs. The non-me related posts that have driven the most traffic are around: emails, driving traffic, Dell Idea Storm, training and viral. It’s interesting that people are interested in email and what’s working [note to self: write more email related posts].

    CLICK THROUGHS (LEAVING BLOG)

    Dom Hind Blog Top clicks - as at 1 November

    Dom Hind Blog Top clicks - as at 1 November

    I’m really happy that Downstream is the number one clicked through site. The interesting thing is that there are only two links to Downstream in my blog: one on the Where have I been? page right at the bottom and the other in the blogroll under search. It shows that some people are reading all of the content in Where have I been?.

    LEARNINGS

    1. Offline coverage – This is definitely the biggest driver of traffic to my blog. I need to invest more time in writing offline pieces to help drive traffic online.
    2. Weekend traffic – As expected over the weekend, the traffic dips to an all time low. A lot of people aren’t looking at work related blogs or information over the weekend. To try and keep traffic consistent, it’s the perfect time to comment on blogs in the US/UK where there is a bigger population and potentially play the numbers game.
    3. Monday traffic – Traffic to my blog is always highest on a Monday, usually after I have had time to prepare a new post over the weekend. To make sure this continues, I need to ensure there is a new blog post every Monday to get people in the behaviour of checking my blog when they get back into the office.
    4. Commenting – When you comment on other blogs, it really does help to drive a huge amount of traffic to your blog (second only to offline coverage). Before I went on holiday, I spent some time on the weekend commenting on others blogs, the following week the traffic was really high even without any new content. I need to comment more on other blogs.
    5. StumbleUpon – Submit your site to StumbleUpon. After you have written what you think will be a popular posts, submit it to StumbleUpon. One thing to be careful of is not over submitting. I submitted every post on my blog and the traffic being directed through halted for three weeks and has only recently starting directing traffic again. My learning from this is being more consistent with submitting rather than submitting multiple posts at the same time.
    6. Social networks – Whenever you join a new social network, make sure you reference your blog URL. Interested friends, colleagues and associates will go and check out what you are writing about (even if it is only once). Tweets don’t drive traffic, but having your URL in your Twitter profile works. Updating your status and including your blog URL helps to drive a lot of traffic.
    7. Own name – The biggest driver of traffic from search has come from my name. Therefore, showing that most traffic is coming to understand who I am and what I have done (most would be attributed to starting a new job). It shows that a blog is the best CV you can have (more on that later).
    8. Tagging – Users arrive at my blog through so many different keyword combinations. It’s hard to tell what the most popular ones would be, so it’s important to include as many different tags and combinations on every post.
    9. Popular posts – The marketing posts that have been the most popular are about email, driving traffic, Dell Idea Storm, training and viral marketing. I need to make sure I am writing more of these posts and then referring to them on others blogs.

    Overall, it’s so interesting assessing all elements of your blog and looking at what else you can be doing.

    RELATED BLOG POSTS (MINE)

    Written by Dominique Hind (nee Layton)

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    Nobody can guarantee your job, except customers


    After eight beautiful nights in The Maldives, I’m very much back into Sydney life. It’s definitely one of the most beautiful places I have ever been and provided an opportunity for me to disconnect from the digital world (no laptop but connected phone), read books (five in eight days) and have a wonderful break with my husband.

    One of the books I read referred management writer, Peter Drucker, and his views on the customer, their expetations and how to manage the customer. There were a few quotes that I thought very interesting, particularly with the economic downturn noise, predictions for budget reductions and need for advertising campaigns to work harder. See quotes below:

    • ‘Nobody can guarantee your job, only customer can guarantee your job’
    • ‘The best companies don’t create customers, they create fans’
    • ‘Customers behave rationally in terms of their own realities and own situation’

    My take out from these quotes is that our customers (or clients) are more important now than ever and we need to make sure we are invaluable to them. How do you make yourself invaluable? Think about what will:

    • Make your client a star in their company (through campaign success or awards)
    • Keep them from being made redundant
    • Present a proactive idea that will answer a business problem
    • Provide them research (or articles) and synopsis
    • Get your clients to their next step, role or position.

    LEARNINGS

    The common theme underlying them all is to ‘think about everything from the clients perspective’ and make sure you are researching to keep on top of their industry.

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