Who has the best designed emails? Air NZ


I hate to say it but airline newsletters are boring. All they focus on are pushing deals and deals with little or no personality included. This is true for all airlines except Air New Zealand.

It doesn’t matter if it is a domestic or international email/offer, every piece of communication has been designed really well. There are elements of every email that are the same, but each have their own idea and design, all represented in the email header (see screens below).

Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

Air NZ Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

Air NZ Get Packing email

Air NZ Get Packing email (holiday deals)

Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

Air NZ Best of the West email

Air NZ Best of the West email

Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

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OBSERVATIONS:

  • Email header: all emails provide the ability to view the email online or to manage your email preferences.
  • Preview pane: the most important part of the email is what is visable in the preview panel. This is what will encourage consumers to click through. The preview panel of each of the above emails is very engaging and encourages opens.
  • Logo: the Air NZ logo appears on the top left-hand side of every email. The only exception is for the holiday deals email (see above Get Packing example).
  • Headline driven: each of the email is headline driven. All of the headlines relates to the offer or element that is being promoted in the email.

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Stay tuned for more Air NZ email review posts. They are coming through soon.

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What else could Apple be doing in their emails?


As a summary to my review of Apple’s email marketing, there is really only one thing to look at: what else should Apple be doing with their email communications? Overall, like everything Apple does, it works. It is clean, simple and effective.

There really aren’t too many other things they should be doing. I have thought of three things they could be doing more of:

  1. Bundling: Apple have got their product emails sorted, they are clean and very focused, but there is a huge opportunity for bundling. They have started this with the latest uni newsletter. However, they can be doing this with so much more.
  2. Asking questions: Apple have never sent me a survey or asked me how I want to interact with them. I’m getting a combination of messages: software, product and event. I’m happy to receive all types, but they are all dry messages. I want something more. More content or more relevance to help me expand my knowledge.
  3. Tailor content: They know what products I have, but the messaging isn’t relevant to this, ie upgrade messaging rather than buy. Where is the accessories push or up-sell in all of these emails?

The common theme throughout these additions is the data smarts and intelligence. There really aren’t many companies getting that right within this space. Victoria Secret‘s and the other US retailers (Bluefly, GAP) are really pioneering the way. They are able to determine your site activity and marry it back to your data and actions, ie if you leave something in the shopping cart on their site, you get an email letting you know it is still there for a limited time.

Most companies think a blanket email (one email for all customers) is enough. With email being so cheap it means you can test things and really understand what works for consumers. The ideal would be to use email as a test bed before any of the above the line communications goes out. Similar to search, it gives you the opportunity to test real-time what is working with your customers before rolling it out with a bigger budget.

Due to the financial opportunity, I wonder if companies will start to realise this and place more importance on communicating to the customers they already have and using them as a test case before spending millions and millions of dollars on media and creative.

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Woolworths Get the Facts – ACCC price enquiry site


While I was at Mark/M&C Saatchi, we created a site for Woolworths to help address any consumer questions that arose out of the ACCC enquiry. It was Woolworths Facts (see screen grabs below).

Woolworths Get the Facts - website

Woolworths Get the Facts - website

It provided information about Woolworths: the amount of money they made, where their supplies came from, facts about the Woolworths business, how global changes affect food prices and a lot more.

Woolworths Facts - Beef supply

Woolworths Facts - Beef supply

Woolworths Facts - Interesting stats

Woolworths Facts - Interesting stats

With so many businesses trying to guarantee their customers that they are being open and honest with them, if a company can’t sustain a blog this is a great alternative. It does need to be maintained and must have topical and relevant information.

LEARNINGS

  1. Media support – the only place this campaign was promoted was via a small promotional tile on the Woolworths homepage. Because Woolworths are the only retailer within the Australian market focused on providing ‘The Facts’, they should be promoting it in additional places.
  2. Email support – building on the media support, there should have been an email sent to the Woolworths Everyday Rewards database. This could have been an element of a usual newsletter rather than a bespoke email focused on ‘The Facts’.
  3. Maintenance – to ensure a site like this remains fresh and relevant, it must be maintained and updated with current information. There needs to be a maintenance plan with regular updates scheduled.

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  1. Get the Facts – Companies trying to be honest
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