Qantas – Checking customer satisfaction for flights


I am extremely loyal to Qantas. I go out of my way to fly them no matter what safety problems or PR issues they are facing. Even when they are late, I will still fly Qantas over any airline.
In August 2010, I received a follow up email asking me about their service & areas for improvement. After flying with Qantas for 15yrs, this was the first request I’ve ever had for areas of improvement.
I would be interesting to know if this was something needed to support all of the current concerns or a whole hearted attempt to improve the service. I haven’t received a follow up or any additional information, but am really interested in what they have done with the information & how they have actually used my responses & the others collected.
The survey took 15mins & was 46 slides/ questions with multiple variations & requirements needed for each answer. The key sections were:
  1. Before we begin
  2. About the flight
  3. Booking this flight
  4. Checking in
  5. Security screening
  6. The terminal
  7. The Qantas Club
  8. Boarding & Departure of your flight
  9. Summing up the on-ground service experience
  10. The Qantas Cabin Crew
  11. Meals & drinks service
  12. The Aircraft facilities
  13. Inflight entertainment
  14. Your flight arrival
  15. Valet parking
  16. About you
  17. Summing up

I’ve captured the survey and uploaded to SlideShare for anyone who is interested.

AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:

There are a couple of areas that should be a focus for Qantas surveys in the future:
  1. Follow up: all of my contact details were provided, so it would make sense that at least an update or status update on what impact the answers had on Qantas & their service.
  2. Options: ability to choose a short or a long version of the survey.

How to make an email look great but work from a template – Air NZ


One of my previous post (Who has the best designed emails? Air NZ) focused on why Air New Zealand have the best designed emails, this one looks at the different elements that are reused or templated between the emails (ie the consistencies).

How often are Air NZ sending emails?

This is a really important question when you are using templates. If emails are sent daily (eick), then the email template needs to be very similar with just minor changes being made prior to sends. Unlike the other airlines (particularly Qantas and JetStar), Air NZ doesn’t spam their base (well not me anyway). Below is an overview of the amount of emails they have sent since December 2008 (total of 14 over 6 months – just over two per month). This means that at least Air NZ don’t need to compromise the design for frequency.

Air NZ emails sent

Air NZ emails sent - 15 December 2008 - 7 June 2009

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WHAT ELEMENTS ARE THE SAME?

Air NZ’s emails are divided into four sections:

  1. Header – each individually designed dependent on the offer/email theme (UNIQUE)
  2. Body – follows a similar format across all emails, but designed dependent on the email theme (PART TEMPLATED)
  3. CTA – exactly the same across all emails (TEMPLATED)
  4. Base (email preferences) – exactly the same across all emails (TEMPLATED)

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Body – below are two examples of the email body and the similarities between them. The two examples show an international email (Aussie Airfares) vs a domestic email (Domestic Airfares). This section is divided into two key parts:

  • offer information
  • functional area where the subscriber can start their airfare search within the email.
Air NZ offers template (email body)

Air NZ offers template (email body) - International

Air NZ offers template (email body) - version 2

Air NZ offers template (email body) - Domestic

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CTA – each of Air NZ’s emails have a really strong call to action and it is consistent across all emails. There are four options for the subscriber (see below) giveing them the option to be directed to the different business areas within Air NZ (holidays and airfares), as well as communication channels (web or phone).

Air NZ calls to action (CTA)

Air NZ calls to action (CTA)

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Base (email preferences) – at the bottom of each of the Air NZ emails, your email preferences are displayed. I really like this feature because you can see which email address you have subscibed with (very beneficial if you have multiple addresses) and also can update the email format easily.

Air NZ email options (bottom of email)

Air NZ email options (bottom of email)

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LEARNINGS

  1. Templates don’t need to mean matching luggage – you can make elements of an email the same without it looking boring.
  2. The design of the header (preview panel) is key – this is the most important part of the email and must be different and appealing to get the cut through. This shouldn’t be templated too much. Some elements should be the same (email not visible, safe list, mobile device, navigation), but there is leverage to be creative and push the design.
  3. Consistent CTA is madatory – rather than try and teach your subscriber how to use the email every time, keep some things consistent. Particularly the CTA element.
  4. Highlight email preferences – don’t hide the subscribers preferences, highlight them and show them what else they can be doing. It adds value.

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Who has the best designed emails? Air NZ


I hate to say it but airline newsletters are boring. All they focus on are pushing deals and deals with little or no personality included. This is true for all airlines except Air New Zealand.

It doesn’t matter if it is a domestic or international email/offer, every piece of communication has been designed really well. There are elements of every email that are the same, but each have their own idea and design, all represented in the email header (see screens below).

Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

Air NZ Domestic Sale Take Off email

Air NZ Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

Air NZ Gotta Go Domestic Deals email 2

Air NZ Get Packing email

Air NZ Get Packing email (holiday deals)

Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

Air NZ Great Aussie Deals emails

Air NZ Best of the West email

Air NZ Best of the West email

Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

Air NZ Quick Aussie Escapes email

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OBSERVATIONS:

  • Email header: all emails provide the ability to view the email online or to manage your email preferences.
  • Preview pane: the most important part of the email is what is visable in the preview panel. This is what will encourage consumers to click through. The preview panel of each of the above emails is very engaging and encourages opens.
  • Logo: the Air NZ logo appears on the top left-hand side of every email. The only exception is for the holiday deals email (see above Get Packing example).
  • Headline driven: each of the email is headline driven. All of the headlines relates to the offer or element that is being promoted in the email.

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Stay tuned for more Air NZ email review posts. They are coming through soon.

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What’s involved in a Social Marketing Strategy?


There is a lot of work involved in keeping a social marketing strategy fresh. It requires time and resources, similar to any other campaign, to ensure that the content (copy, images and video) are kept updated and all comments responded to. You can’t ‘set and forget’ social marketing, someone needs to be monitoring any noise/comments constantly. This is especially true if there is negative PR and press about brands.

There is so much to get right and it an evolving process where learnings are continuous. All learnings you get, whether positive or negative, help refine and develop what you need to be doing with social marketing. Similar to most things, the more mistakes you make the better you will get at social marketing.

A blog post written by Hjörtur Smárason suggests that there are six common mistakes made by companies in social marketing. They include:

  1. Not listening
  2. Not adding any value
  3. Faking it
  4. Using traditional media tactics in social media
  5. Building the network too late
  6. Not investing

A great example of a company wanting to get involved with social marketing, but not totally understanding the implications, is a large Australian telco. This telco invited feedback on one of their brand sites, but hasn’t got the processes set up behind the scenes to ensure any comments or feedback is taken on board and fed back into the company. They are trying to change things internally so they can listen to their customers and improve their service.

A company that has got it right is Dell with their Idea Storm. This is easily one of my favourite social marketing/blogging examples. When they initially started their blog, they got it so wrong and over time they have used their learnings to refine what they are doing. Dell dipped their toe into the water at the time when they were having problems with their batteries (in particular blowing up on planes). They needed to do something because people started blogging about how bad the customer service was and how crap the product was. Their first response was a blog called Direct to Dell. Unfortunately this was a one-way blog where all comments were moderated prior to appearing on the blog. This caused a lot of uproar and in response they developed Idea Storm, which helps to contain any negativity, generate new product development and monitor consumer sediment towards their products. BRILLIANT! The perfect customer service, research and product development tool.

DEVELOPING YOUR SOCIAL MARKETING STRATEGY

There are five things you need to do before getting involved with social marketing:

  1. Understand the market – What is happening? Who is talking or making the most noise? Where are the noises being posted? Is it corporates or individuals talking the most? What are they saying about competitors? (see hints below)
  2. Define why – What is the purpose for getting involved? Is it commercial, CSR or other? What do you want to get out of it? What are the objectives? What is the vision? What are you hoping to achieve? Customer insights? Customer feedback? Customer learnings? Advocacy?
  3. Moderation – How is what you put out there going to be moderated? How often is it going to be moderated? When will it be moderated? Do you have the resources to moderate it? How will you respond to comments? Will you remove comments or respond to negative feedback?
  4. Feedback – How will the feedback be fed back into the company? Who will lead the project? Who will lead the response to feedback? How will you communicate that the feedback has been heard? How will you update the audience on the progress of the feedback?
  5. Maintenance – What else do you want to add? How often do you want to update/refresh content?

UNDERSTANDING THE MARKET

Before getting involved with social marketing it is critical to understand the space. There are several free tools available to help you know what consumers are saying about brands, including:

  • Dipity – after typing in a keyword (or your clients brand), it provides an overview of the word on a timeline – taking YouTube and Flickr into account. If you type in Qantas the images you see go back to photos taken in 1960, see details below:
Timeline of all Qantas tagged photos on Flickr using Dipity

Timeline of all Qantas tagged photos on Flickr using Dipity

  • Powerset – allows you to search through Wikipedia and track all of the content about a particular topic. Again Qantas was used for this search (see below) and it brings back relevant company information and comments about the airline.
Qantas results from Wikipedia using Powerset

Qantas results from Wikipedia using Powerset

Written by Dominique Hind
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